Blended Index: How to Create a CX Single Metric

The use of blended indices is quickly becoming a best practice as companies attempt to connect the dots across many sources of data being collected for their organizations. No single measurement tells the whole story—and that’s particularly true of multi-location businesses. Why? Because locations are looking at operational excellence metrics, satisfaction and loyalty metrics, as well as financial metrics to understand how they perform. And how they perform needs to be within the context of the brand itself and peer groups. In order to make sense of the rich data sources, we recommend constructing a blended index.

WHAT is a blended index?

A blended index creates a composite score from multiple data sources, spanning operational and customer metrics. The algorithm must normalize the data so that scales are not an issue (e.g. mystery shopping on a 100 point scale, customer satisfaction on a 5 point scale, or contacts on a number of complaints/1000 transactions). The algorithm should also flex to weight specific metrics. This single score provides the brand—and your locations—with a holistic view of performance across all metrics.

WHY should I have a Blended Index?

A blended index that spans across operational and customer metrics helps you understand performance as a whole. The magic happens when you bump that information up against a financial metric like same store sales growth, revenue per available room, or volume of gas sold. You’ll then want to understand the performance of every location on that grid to determine where you will want to require better operations, more marketing to drive traffic, management changes, and adoption of best practices.

HOW do I get value from a Blended Index?

The final step in maximizing your value from a blended index requires socializing the information with the rest of the organization. Executives and managers from both operations and marketing need to understand the numbers. More importantly, they need to drive action across the organization. Finding the critical drivers—specific actions that can be taken to change scores on the blended metric—must happen. Without that commitment, you’ll be looking at data that stays the same and never changes—and that will not help you grow your brand. 

Sam McKeveny is Head of Program Development, North America at Market Force Information. Sam consults with client executives to design program architectures that systematically improve operational execution, customer delight and sales growth.

Customer Experience Management: Revamp Your System!

Have you been measuring the same things in your customer experience surveys for the past three years? Has your mystery shopping program been in place with little change? Has it been 6 months or more since your team met to clearly assess your measurement program—including spend and ROI? If so, it’s time to step back and do a clear-eyed evaluation.

Too often, measurement systems are left running untouched for months or years. That’s a mistake. The market is dynamic, customer expectations change, and your own products and services change as well. Granted, there is a cost to making changes:

  • You do want a stable measurement system to track and trend results;
  • If compensation is tied to results, changes may need to roll out slowly;
  • There’s work involved—and that includes aligning stakeholders.

However, the benefits of carefully evaluating and fine-tuning your program far outweigh the challenges. You will want to:

  • Find the gaps. What methodologies need to be added to assess brand and store level performance? What focus areas or questionnaires need changed?
  • Align the questions. Remember to construct a questionnaire matrix to ensure that you use the same wording and scales across your measurement instruments.
  • Evaluate communication. Go out to franchisees, the front line, managers—all users of the data—and ask whether they are getting what they need to better manage their business. If they aren’t, you’ll need to rethink that strategy.
  • Raise the bar. Demand more of your teams. We have one client who raises standards every year in order to remain best-in-class. The bar he’s set in demanding exceptional customer experience has become a real challenge to competitors.

Market Force provides CX Strategic Planning workshops to assist with this process. We’d be glad to discuss how we might help you. In the meantime, check out a video published by The Telegraph interviewing Cheryl Flink, Chief Strategy Officer for Market Force. You’ll find some great tips for designing your customer experience management program. 

Gino Virgadamo is a Key Account Manager at Market Force Information, specialising in the pub, restaurant and petrol-convenience industries. Over the past 4 years, he has helped businesses understand key drivers & trends, as well as provide strategic planning to drive ROI and stay ahead of the market. 

Create a Restaurant Measurement System That Produces Real Results

Measurements are the key enablers to drive accountability and effective business and consumer analytics, as well as to help companies grow and strengthen their business performance. When I led a team at McDonald's that was charged with developing and implementing a world-class measurement system that centered on the critical drivers of restaurant performance and customer satisfaction, there were specific key elements/enablers that made it so effective. Let’s take a look at them.

1. Management buy-in before all else

The first and foremost step in creating a measurement system for your restaurant brand is to obtain support from senior management. Like any major initiative a company undertakes, it requires funding, people resources and management support to address any pushback within the organization regarding the need or direction of the project.

After the business case has been made and approved by senior management, you then need to create a cross-functional team that represents all of the critical segments of the business that will either be impacted or able to add value to the process design. This is critical to ensure you receive the best input on the design and structure of the measurement tools and processes. Plus, it lends credibility to the process, and helps turn those involved in the project design into advocates and supporters of the end product.

 

2. Set achievable and actionable metrics

The next step is to sit down with your team and ensure that the metrics or targets for the components you’re planning to evaluate possess the following characteristics:

  • Actionable – Are they in the control of the people who are being measured?
  • Realistic – Are they achievable or too far fetched?
  • Targeted – Make sure the targets are designed around the critical drivers for your business and customers’ expectations
  • Data-friendly – Data must be captured at the unit level to help determine root-causes and assist in developing effective action plans
3. Outsource the feedback gathering

Enlist quality third-party partners to help you capture and evaluate customer feedback on your brand and service, to assess in-store performance relative to your standards, and to gather employee input on their day-to-day experiences (e.g. customer satisfaction surveys, mystery shopping audits and employee commitment surveys). This is typically a more cost-effective way to capture the data versus trying to do it internally, and these are professionals who do this all day every day.

4. Tap technology – don’t undertake it all yourself

Leverage technology wherever possible to capture, input and report data performance at all levels of the organization. Spend the time upfront to perfect this process because, in the long run, it will guarantee the data is captured efficiently and reported back to the appropriate people in a friendly, summarized format. Technology will also assure the reports and analytics (e.g. unit rankings, top and bottom performers, trending, etc.) are performed in a cost-efficient manner, as they can easily start eating up lots of man-hours. The other benefit is that your performance data will be available any time and any place your staff wants to access it.

 

5. Don’t skip the training

Once the reporting is finalized – or even alongside it – you should be developing a comprehensive training program to educate all of the people in the system on all the tools, processes and reporting and, even more importantly, making it clear how they can tap them to drive increases in performance. The key here is to communicate early and often to all of the impacted people, so they have a thorough understanding of what, why and how the new performance improvement system operates.

6. Review and review again

Lastly, it's critical that you periodically review the measurement system and processes that you decide upon to make sure they’re still current and relative. Don’t go too long without taking stock because you’ll quickly fall behind in a fast-moving industry. Any significant enhancements or changes should be implemented ASAP.

Keep in mind that developing an effective measurement system will take time and dedicated resources. It's a journey and customers may not notice the performance improvements over night, but rest assured that they will eventually take note. When approached correctly, it will be a valuable tool to help drive performance improvements at both the unit and system level.

Any organization with numerous locations spread out geographically, such as multi-location restaurant brands, needs a quality measurement system to help them measure and assess performance consistently and timely. These tools are also the key enablers that will help you react to problems quickly, determine if action plans are working and begin building an accountability culture throughout the organization.

 

Jerry Calabrese was responsible for a global restaurant measurement system that evaluated and helped to significantly improve the performance of 32,000 restaurants in 100+ countries in the period from 2002 to 2008. As VP of Restaurant Measurement at McDonald’s Corporation, his leadership and implementation of tools and processes were a key enabler and significant factor in the financial and operational turnaround of the company during his tenure that helped McDonald’s improve its performance and brand image during that time period.

Schedule a Briefing

To discuss your needs for improving performance for your multi-location brand, give us a call. We’d be happy to discuss best practices for measuring the customer experience and compliance to brand standards, using analytics to understand what matters most and the ROI for change, and technology solutions that integrate large quantities of data on one single platform. We look forward to a great discussion!

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