eBook: Customer Experience Measurement

This eBook explores methodologies and approaches for measuring customer experience in multi-location businesses. We look at pros and cons based on our experience with hundreds of client programs that address the needs of large and complex Fortune 10 brands with thousands of locations, to emerging brands with 100 or fewer locations.

 

 

 

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5 Best Practices for CX Success

Having worked in the CX space for 14 years across a variety of multi-location brands, I have seen a common thread in customer experience programs that are successful in improving customer satisfaction and driving business results. Not coincidentally, these programs follow recommended best practices:

  1. Strategy: The program is aligned to strategic objectives
  2. Multiple Lenses: Various performance measures (mystery shop, audits, customer surveys, employee surveys, etc.) are used to provide an understanding of location-level and brand performance
  3. Predicative Analytics: Data modeling is employed to identify what matters most to customers
  4. Technology Reporting: Tech stacks are simplified and amplified by integrating multiple performance measures and internal data into a single platform
  5. Accountability: Key stakeholders are responsible for both monitoring and taking action on program results

Many times—after much time and money is spent on strategy development, launching services and technology—there are shortfalls in setting accountability and taking action on results. The fifth best practice is often the hardest.

Assign ownership and accountability  An essential component of any measurement program is establishing who has responsibility for monitoring and taking action on results. Just having a metric in place won’t make your customers more satisfied, and it won’t make your business magically improve. As we have often seen, just knowing the score does not change the score. You have to be purposeful in assigning ownership and accountability for results.   

In setting accountability, we have found that organizations that communicate the “Ws” (and one “H”) perform best in driving true business performance improvement:

  • Establish and document who is accountable for monitoring the results
  • Tell them the why behind your CX program, so they understand the mission and goals of the program and the organization
  • Explain how satisfaction is factored into various corporate objectives as well as MBOs and WIGs
  • Tell them what they should be doing with results,
  • Teach them where results can be found,
  • Define when they should be reviewing results and taking action

Monitor results  Whatever you chose as your satisfaction metric, you will have a score. Knowing your score is good, but the score isn’t actually the be-all end-all. You need to understand how your score changes over time. Is customer satisfaction improving or declining?  Is a low score one month just a blip on the radar, or, is there a downward trend in customer satisfaction? In either case, what is driving that change in score? Does your program help you understand that?  

Understand what impacts customer satisfaction  A key success factor to improving customer satisfaction is your ability to identify the things that are most important to your customer’s satisfaction. This may take a bit of work, and you may not have an in-house analyst who can model your data. Your CX partner should be able to provide these insights to you. It is well worth the investment to know which behaviors are most impactful to your customers’ satisfaction. 

Take action  Once you know the behaviors that result in delighted customers, look back at your performance to understand how you are doing in those areas, and take action – train your employees, create incentive plans, hold store staff accountable, and change policies that don’t work for customers—to gain improvements. 

The process doesn’t stop; keep monitoring results and taking action. Customer satisfaction isn’t a one and done proposition. You have to be dedicated to making it an integral part of your business. Lucky for you there are proven best practices for success.

If you would like to learn more about these best practices and how industry-leading organizations are leveraging them to drive improvements in their business, please click here for more information on a powerful decision support system called Success Playbook.

  Success Playbook

Alicia Picard is a Senior Strategy Director and has been with Market Force for 14 years.  She consults with clients across a variety of industries to help them protect their brands, delight customers and make more money.  

Traditional Banks Losing Ground in the Battle for Customer Loyalty

The 2017 Customer Experiences and Competitive Benchmarks Study has just been released by Market Force and the results should serve as a call to action for banks across the country. Despite the best of intentions and millions of dollars invested for customer experience improvements, customer loyalty scores at traditional banks have declined across the board. And not surprisingly, the percentage of consumers who say they intend on switching banks in the next 6 months has edged up to 14% in 2017.  

The Current Situation:

Customer loyalty among the nation’s largest retail banks declined an average of 6.5% as measured by Market Force’s Customer Loyalty Index (CLI) over the last year.   

This decline in customer loyalty is evident in the deterioration of the two underlying metrics that comprise the CLI: satisfaction with one’s primary bank and the likelihood for a consumer to recommend their primary bank to a friend or colleague. 

In 2016, 1 in 10 consumers were dissatisfied with their primary bank. In 2017, that figure has increased substantially to 1 in 5 consumers who now say they are dissatisfied with their primary bank. Similarly, in 2016, 1 in 5 consumers would not recommend their primary bank. In 2017, that figure has increased to 1 in 4 consumers who say they would not recommend their primary bank. 

Of course, we would intuitively assume that there is a direct relationship between a consumer’s level of satisfaction with their primary bank and the likelihood that they would recommend that bank to friends and colleagues. But what many are not aware of is the significance of that relationship.  

Market Force’s data scientists have quantified the relationship between those two metrics and found that a customer who is delighted (i.e. gives their primary bank a 5 on a 5-point satisfaction scale) with their primary bank is 4.4 times more likely to recommend their primary bank as compared to a customer who is generally satisfied (i.e. gives their primary bank a 4 on a 5-point scale).

What can be done to stop the decline?

To answer this question, banks must study the broader experience of consumers as they interact with non-traditional financial services and non-financial services providers (e.g., Apple, Amazon, Nordstrom, PayPal, USAA, Venmo, and Zelle). Not only are there lessons to be learned from these customer experience leaders, but opportunities for partnerships or acquisitions as well.       

Traditional banks must also take time out to thoroughly evaluate the state of their current customer experience program. In speaking with dozens of major banks across North America, I have observed that most banks have an abundance of data and enthusiasm paired with inconsistent or, in some cases, practically non-existent execution. A sign hanging in the office of the head of customer experience at one of the largest banks in North America said it best, “Data, data everywhere and not a thought to think.”

Despite the best of intentions and millions of dollars of investment in technology, many banks struggle with understanding and effectively communicating what’s most important, identifying which opportunities for improvement exist and isolating which opportunities will deliver the greatest ROI. Even fewer banks have done a good job of having a consistent, technology-enabled process of conducting insight-driven action planning and driving transparency and accountability for execution.

This lack of execution has not gone unnoticed by customers. In fact, when asked about their primary bank’s performance on several key satisfaction drivers, a third of consumers said their primary bank did not perform any of them well. Had these banks performed well on all of the satisfaction drivers, they would have experienced a 90% lift in customer satisfaction according to advanced predictive modeling performed by Market Force’s industry leading analytics team.  

If the issues cited above sound all too familiar, Market Force can help. To find out more about how you can improve customer experience, loyalty, and financial performance, or simply learn more about the 2017 Customer Experience and Competitive Benchmark Study, please schedule a briefing

Schedule a Briefing

Chuck Rogers is the Financial Services Practice Leader for Market Force.  Chuck enables clients to attract, grow and retain customer revenue streams by providing a unique blend of customer experience thought leadership, research-based consulting and industry expertise.

Tags: Banking
Banking Consumer Study 2016

Digital wallet adoption sees sharp increase, although Google Wallet and Apple Pay lose ground

Louisville, Colo., Oct. 25, 2017 — A new nationwide study by Market Force Information® (Market Force), a worldwide leader in customer experience management, found that over one-fifth of banking customers are not satisfied with their current bank, and more are considering switching bank brands, compared to a year ago. The study also ranked Capital One as consumers’ favorite retail bank.

More than 6,500 bank customers were polled for the study, which also provides insights into banking trends, bank technology adoption and credit card usage.

Capital One Ranks No. 1

Capital One ranked as customers’ favorite bank out of the traditional banks included in the study. It earned a 48% score on Market Force’s Composite Loyalty Index, which represents an average of how satisfied consumers were with their last banking experience and how likely they’d be to recommend the bank to others. Regions Bank and US Bank tied for a close second with 47%, while PNC bank – last year’s leader – ranked third with 46%. All of the bank brands lost ground compared to 2016, with Wells Fargo dropping a sizable 13 percentage points as it seeks to bounce back from last year’s fraud incident.

Graph 1: Favorite National Retail Banks

Market Force also asked participants to rank the top banks based on attributes that drive satisfaction. Regions Bank, which didn’t earn enough votes to qualify for last year’s rankings, took the top spot in most categories, such as reputation, ease of transactions and fair rates. US Bank ranked highest for trust. Bank of America and Wells Fargo trailed in every category.

Graph 2: Retail Banks Ranked by Attributes

 

With Satisfaction Down, Banks Risk Losing Market Share

Satisfaction levels have dropped considerably this year – 23% report being dissatisfied with their current bank relationship, compared to just 15% in 2016. This underlying dissatisfaction also means fewer people are likely to recommend their banks and more are considering switching banks. Fourteen percent of all banking customers are considering switching banks in the next six months (a 2% increase) and, of those, the highest percentage are considering switching from Wells Fargo to another brand. [See Graph 3].

Graph 3: Considering Switching Banks by Brand

“Loyalty to traditional banks is wavering in the face of rapidly evolving consumer preferences, the proliferation of digital bank alternatives and fintech companies that are more adept at providing a superior digital customer experience,” said Chuck Rogers, financial services practice leader for Market Force. “Building trust is as important as ever, but our research finds there are other areas where bank brands can make inroads with their existing and new customer bases, including demonstrating that they’re invested in their customers’ financial well-being and customizing services to fit their needs.”

Mobile Apps Hold Steady, Digital Wallets See Spike

Technology is a bright point for major bank brands, with usage on the rise. The majority (79%) of customers have downloaded their bank’s mobile app, and 84% report using it at least weekly. Checking balances, checking statement and payment history, and making deposits are the most popular app uses.

For those who aren’t using their bank’s app, security remains an impediment to adoption, cited as a reason by 31% of those who have not downloaded their bank’s mobile app. About one in five – skewing largely toward males – said they see no benefit in using a phone for banking. 

Graph 4:  Reasons Why Not Using Bank’s App

While app usage is slowly and steadily increasing, digital wallets and e-wallets have seen an upward spike across all generations. The study found 23% of consumers are using digital wallets, compared to just 14% who reported doing so in 2016. PayPal is the most popular by a wide margin, while Google Wallet saw a significant drop in usage, and Apple Pay also lost ground. [See Graph 5]. Most are using them to make payments and to send and receive money.

Graph 5: Digital Wallet Adoption Rates

Branches Still Relevant, Well Visited

Despite the uptick in technology use, customers continue to visit their banks’ physical locations. Twelve percent go to a branch at least weekly to complete a teller transaction. Additionally, more than one in five visit a personal banker at least monthly, but primarily for help resolving problems, rather than to seek information or advice. Regions Bank’s and Chase’s personal bankers are the highest rated, earning top scores in areas such as asking questions, providing clear and relevant information and offering solutions. Bank of America ranked lowest in all of these categories. 

Graph 6: Performance of Personal Bankers by Brand

 

Credit Card Use

Of the 82% who use a credit card, most reported using cards issued by Capital One, Chase and Discover. About three in four use their credit card’s website, mainly to see statements and make payments. Additionally, 46% use their credit card’s mobile app, and they are most satisfied with apps from PNC and American Express.

Survey Demographics

The survey was conducted online in August 2017 across the United States. The pool of 6,518 U.S. banking customers represented a cross-section of the four Census regions and reflected a broad spectrum of income levels, with 51% reporting household incomes of more than $50,000 a year. Respondents’ ages ranged from 18 to over 65. Approximately 74% were female, 25% were male and 1% preferred not to answer.

About Market Force Information

Market Force Information is a customer experience (CX) management company that provides location-level measurement solutions that help businesses protect their brand reputation, delight customers and make more money. Solutions include customer experience surveys, employee engagement surveys, mystery shopping, on-site audits, contact center services and social media review tracking, which are all integrated into one technology and analytics platform, KnowledgeForce®. Founded in 2005, Market Force has a growing global presence, with offices in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France and Spain. It serves over 200 clients that operate multi-location businesses, including major retailers, restaurants, grocery and drug stores, petro/convenience operators, banking and financial services providers as well as the entertainment industry. The company was recognized in 2017 as one of the top 50 market research organizations in the AMA Gold Report and by Forrester as a Breakout Vendor. For more information, visit www.marketforce.com.

 

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Date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Retail is not Dead: Suggestive Sell Index

We continue to be told that brick and mortar stores are going the way of the dinosaur, that they will all be gone before long and that Amazon will be the one-stop shop for all purchases that we make. And to look at the number of retail store closings for 2017, there is certainly strong evidence to support that conclusion.

Source: "There's one major thing everyone gets wrong about Amazon and the retail apocalypse," Hayley Peterson, Business Insider, July 22, 2017.

And while it is true that certain retail store formats are struggling, the truth is others are thriving. One example is Ace Hardware. Ace Hardware just came in first place for customer satisfaction and loyalty in Market Force Information’s annual Home Improvement Study. They placed well in the study largely because of their focus on in-store selling. As they say, “Ace is the place with the helpful hardware folks.” It is true that sales floor associates at Ace Hardware are just better at greeting customers, engaging them as to why they came in, assessing that need, making the appropriate recommendation and then asking for the sale. Simple, right?

Well, unfortunately a good number of retail brands don’t execute on this simple set of behaviors as effectively as they could. Some companies feel like asking customers for the sale feels like pestering and they worry about coming across as high pressure so they counsel their retail teams to avoid it. And even those brands that do share a sales process with their store personnel have difficulty sometimes ensuring that the process is followed consistently. As a result, retailers are leaving sales on the floor. Sales that could drive revenue. Sales that could help turn comps positive for a change.

Another large retail brand that works with Market Force absolutely gets it. In our research of their customer experience survey data, we found that those customers who received a product recommendation during their visit were more satisfied with their experience and showed a higher likelihood to recommend the brand after the visit. So we learned that upselling in this retail store drives customer experience and loyalty to the brand. This is counterintuitive to some people, but true nonetheless. This same brand was able to capitalize on this insight by measuring and improving in-store behaviors. After implementing a store-based training initiative, they were able to increase the percentage of times store staff engaged customers on the sales floor by 6% (from 71% to 77%) over the course of one quarter. During those 77% of customer visits where the customers were engaged, they reported 96% of the time a specific recommendation was made. And of those recommendations, the customer reported making that purchase 50% of the time, which translated to $32M in sales for the quarter.

Most retailers absolutely have the opportunity to capitalize on this aspect of in-store selling, including home improvement, home furnishings, wireless retail, fashion apparel and many others.  Collaborating with brands in these segments and recognizing the importance of upsell to customer perception and financial success, Market Force has developed the Suggestive Sell Index - a way of reporting on in-store effectiveness and the corresponding lift to retail sales that it produces. A white paper on the topic can be downloaded here. Brands can optimize their Suggestive Sell Index by following three simple steps:

  • Assess customer’s needs  Each team member that interacts with customers need to ask thoughtful questions about the customer and what they are seeking. Even a simple greeting followed by “what brought you in today?” can uncover critical insight into how best to serve that customer.
  • Make a recommendation  If the team member has been able to strike an authentic, not forced or robotic, conversation with the customer, they should have a general understanding of their need and be in a position to make a recommendation that most closely aligns with their need and helps them make a decision.
  • Ask for the sale  It is important that once the team member has made the recommendation that they follow through. ABC – always be closing. Simply asking, “Can I ring this up for you?” or “Can I put this in your cart for you?” helps move the conversation from an interaction to a transaction.

Brands that can effectively train their staff on these behaviors and then put measurement processes in place to ensure that they are being followed show higher customer satisfaction scores, better brand loyalty and increased financial performance. If you have retail stores or you are thinking about opening them, you would be wise to invest in the team members that you staff them with and ensure that they are following a best practices sales process. It is a truly strategic way to protect your brand, delight customers and drive powerful financial results. I can think of no better focus to have. 

  Download White Paper

Brad Christian is a Managing Director at Market Force and has been with the company for 11 years consulting retail brands on how best to implement customer experience programs that provide insight into strategic investment decision-making that helps them protect their brands, delight their customers and make more money. 

Creating a CX Measurement Program That Works: It’s Not About the Score!

A Common Mistake—Focusing on the Wrong Target

When I was a franchise operator, the franchisor was excited about creating a successful new CX survey program. After using the system for a few months, the executives reviewed their progress and identified five key drivers of satisfaction. They believed that if all of their locations would focus on the five drivers, CX scores and revenues would naturally increase. They were so confident this would happen that they decided to set a target score and incentivize the employees so they would hit the target. The incentive was a $.25 per hour raise for every month their restaurant hit the target score.

The program was a success…kind of…well, not really. Yes, all of the locations hit or exceeded the target score and received a $.25 per hour increase in pay (which is highly unlikely and should have raised red flags for all of us).

Determining the drivers. What we should have been doing was figuring out exactly what factors needed to change to deliver an excellent customer experience. We should have been tying both the operational measures that we had collected through either audits or mystery shops and aligned that with what our customers had to say about us via our survey program. This is no trivial exercise. It requires a specific modeling process to understand the linkages between behaviors and perceptions. We just didn’t have the Ph.D. statisticians and data scientists on staff that could help us draw those conclusions—the specific on-site behaviors, that when executed in combination, drive the highest levels of overall satisfaction with our customers—or delighting them.

Tying to financials. My new firm, Market Force Information, leverages just this type of talent and modeling process to help brands understand three things, i) what matters most to its clients' customers, ii) where operational deficiencies exist, and iii) what the specific financial ROI would be for implementing various targeted improvements. This is made possible by incorporating financial measures in the analysis such as same store sales or same store sales growth. It is this kind of analytics that truly provide the strategic insight required to make sound business decisions as to which stores to invest in and what focus that investment should take. I would have loved to have had this available to us.

Focusing on the score. In the case of my company, the big mistake we made was to focus on just the score as opposed to focusing on the behaviors that drove the score. Understanding the importance of "please" and "thank you" or what the specific speed of service needed to be in order to avoid frustrating customers is critical to charting what matters and focusing action plans on how to address them.

Gaming the system. As a result, by incentivizing the employees based on achieving a score, the goal changed from “delivering an amazing customer experience” to “gaming the system so they can make more money.” (Yes, we have seen instances where staff or friends of staff filled out favorable surveys.)

Measuring execution objectively. In order to minimize the problem of gaming the system and to ensure that the survey data that you collect is accurate, you need sufficient fraud protection and detection capabilities as well as other measures of restaurant performance besides just a survey. Having other measures like social media review tracking or mystery shopping ensures that you are getting a much more holistic view of the customer experience. These measures can be aligned with your survey scores to provide assurances that what you are learning in your survey is factual. 

Measuring to improve each location. By leveraging multiple measures and reporting on each key behavior uncovered in the analytics objectively, you’ll be able to see exactly what a restaurant needs to improve upon. All restaurants are not equal. Typically a handful of restaurants consistently execute at a high level, while others are abysmal and reflect poorly on the brand, and most are somewhere in the middle. The challenge is let each location know exactly where they need to improve.

Does this make sense? In the case of my company, it would have been immediately apparent that something was awry if the higher scores did not translate into increased revenues. Our analytics practice has repeatedly seen clear correlations between high scores on both surveys and mystery shops and increased same-store sales performance.

A better way. My learning here was that we should have focused on behaviors instead of scores. In upcoming posts I will offer up exactly how brands can focus on those behaviors that drive change, as well as how to effectively drive change down to the individual restaurant level.

Learn about our Analytics

Troy Mott is a Director of Sales at Market Force and works with restaurant clients to help them understand what matters most to their customers, where they have operational gaps in execution and what specific financial ROI can be derived by implementing specific initiatives.  His experience in working in restaurants and with restaurant executives makes him a sought after resource for operations measurement, customer experience and growth initiatives.

Empower Your Auditors with Eyes:On Mobile App

The Eyes:OnTM mobile app allows your auditors to complete questionnaires with their Android and iOS smartphones and tablets. Geo-location and geo-fencing technologies help auditors easily link to the sites they are evaluating, and auditors can complete their work offline even if connectivity drops. Need photos? Users can attach photographs to questionnaires from their smart phones. 

With just a few clicks, your staff can complete audits and upload directly to the KnowledgeForce® reporting platform. Audits become an additional datastream sitting alongside other brand and location level data like mystery shops, customer surveys, contact center, and social media.

Breakthroughs in Modeling Customer Loyalty: Machine Learning

In February, Forrester Research released its report titled “The Forrester Wave™: Insights Service Providers Q1 2017 | Leaders Emerge in a Nascent Insights Services Market” written by Jennifer Belissent, PhD and Elizabeth Cullen. Forrester included Market Force Information® as a domain-specific insights provider in their consolidated vendor landscape. A graphic from this report calls out Market Force in an ecosystem of industry-specific, domain-specific, and broad insights service provider. We are very proud to be recognized for our innovations in linking customer experience metrics to financial ROI, and a joint video with Forrester presents case studies giving examples of how we do that.

I am one of the data scientists on the Market Force analytics team driving insights innovations in the CX space. We’ve been addressing a thorny modeling issue related to collinearity. Collinearity is a statistical phenomenon in which two (or more) explanatory variables are highly correlated, meaning that one can predict the other. For example, in the retail space, the predictors—associate helpfulness and associate friendliness—can predict customer satisfaction, but they can also predict each other. This creates a situation where the behaviors share explanatory power of customer satisfaction, creating redundancy and causing significant issues with predictors, including their perceived impact on customer satisfaction and the deterioration of integrity within the modeling process.

The presence of collinearity in customer experience data can negatively affect the quality of predictive models and may lead to incorrect or incomplete insights. That means that when those insights are converted to business initiatives, there is potential to focus on the wrong things. The hard work put in by managers and operators will not have the predicted impact. This sounds dismal for multi-location businesses, but innovations in statistics and machine learning have brought predictive modeling techniques to the market that mitigate the impact of collinearity.

Enter LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) and ridge regressions. These techniques are machine learning linear regression models that use sophisticated computation analysis to control collinearity and produce the most predictive models possible. The two modeling techniques, each presenting its own unique solution to collinearity, work by computing tens of thousands of algorithmic operations to determine the most predictive combination of coefficients, or weighting, to be applied to each predictor. Both modeling techniques remove collinearity through shrinking the weighting of variables and eliminating the redundant explanatory power of collinear predictors.

In preliminary tests using these machine-learning techniques, Market Force Information has discovered that model predictiveness increases by as much as 10%.  The integration of these sophisticated models has increased the ability to generalize findings and predict future outcomes. This results in clear and productive direction to our clients on where they should focus to improve the customer experience, increase revenue, and reduce costs.

If you would like to discuss how we can help you leverage your CX data to link to a financial ROI, please schedule a briefing or call us at 1-877-329-9621 and we will be glad to discuss!

Schedule a Briefing

Aaron Zelmanow is Senior Data Scientist at Market Force Information with a Master's in Statistics and a background in business operations and finance. Specializing in the retail industry, Aaron provides analytics and actionable insights for clients to maximize customer satisfaction and increase their bottom-line revenue.

Insights Top the Data Value Chain

In a Forrester Research article authored by Jennifer Belissent, PhD, Forrester, the author defines insights services in this way:

"Insights services combine internal and external data sourcing and advanced analytics to deliver actionable business insights that clients subscribe to and apply to specific functional or verticalbusiness use cases."

                      —Insights Services Disrupt The Data And Analytics Market, February 8, 2016

She goes on to describe the data value chain, with four major components:

  • Data management: Collect and store
  • Data governance: Clean and secure
  • Data analytics: Discover and analyze
  • Insights delivery: Act and automate

The research concludes that while companies invest in data management and governance, they too often neglect the last two components—understanding what the data say and acting on it.

We have first-hand experience with this phenomenon at Market Force. Brands spend a great deal of time and money ensuring their customer experience (CX) data has high integrity, is clean and well-secured, and can be properly accessed. However, brands too often choose to minimize their investment in analytics and insights—either using internal or external resources. This is a critical mistake.

When brands choose not to invest in proper analytics and change management tools, they create four critical challenges for their organization:

  1. Customers will assume that the brand is not listening to their perspective, resulting in an erosion of trust and good faith.
  2. The people who can drive change lack the information and tools to actually execute change. Scores will begin to stagnate.
  3. Given the lack of information, operators will assume or invent actions that they should take—and they may or may not be the right ones. Scores won’t change and they may consider their efforts futile or question the integrity of the data.
  4. Executives will begin to question their investment in CX data collection—and will inevitably cut the budget. What should have been a brand imperative will experience an untimely death.

This cycle occurs far too often. To ensure that your brand can leverage the ROI of its data investment, you must invest in data scientists and other analysts who can surface meaningful insights that can be translated into real actions with tangible ROI. Do not neglect this most important part of the data value chain. Instead, make this the bright line of excellence for your program.

LEARN MORE about Market Force's analytics and insights methodologies, and then schedule a briefing. We’d be glad to walk you through methods and proof points.

Schedule a Briefing

As Chief Strategy Officer, Cheryl aligns Market Force's strategic direction with our clients' strategic objectives. She oversees the North American client base, Analytics and Insights, Winnipeg Operations and Marketing. She has a Ph.D. in social psychology and broad business experience in both private and public companies.​

Eyes:On – Personal perception

Market Force continuously evolves its product set to meet the needs of our clients. One of those needs is providing an easy way for our clients’ internal teams to compile and report audits. We have just released our new Eyes:On audit app, a tool that saves auditors time and make data more tangible.

I am privileged to work with a Market Force client in the retail industry with over 900 locations here in the UK. This client has implemented the Eyes:On app, going from an internal audit tool that could only be completed via desktop to a fully functional app on mobile and tablet devices. Being able to complete an audit with mobile technology—but not requiring a connection to complete a report while in the field—has improved productivity. This has been extremely useful for them as auditors would sometimes have no or limited connectivity. To make matters more complex, auditors had to rely on notes completed after the visit, making it more likely results would be inaccurate. With the app, auditors fill out information real time. Our client says the app has helped them reduce costs by reducing man hours and improving quality. Instead of spending hours filling in documents, teams can focus on what the data actually say.

There has been another benefit to consolidating the audit information: The audit data has really helped my client improve their mystery shopping scores by being firm but fair on their internal visits as they now have two sources of data pointing towards similar results—all consolidated in one place. This is the perfect opportunity to coach operators and franchisees with useful information that will help them improve their stores.

Finally, our client now uses the app to collect additional information, like presence of POS materials and checks on inventory. That has prevented them from over-ordering and reduces the risk of waste.

The feedback we have received from all members of staff that use the app has been phenomenal: They find it user-friendly and a great tool. Our client has been more than pleased with how the app has helped them improve their business!

To learn more about Market Force’s Eyes:On app for auditors, download the data sheet or schedule a briefing with one of our sales representatives. We’d love to give you a demo!

Ross Lloyd is a Market Force account manager in London, working on building and maintaining relationships with clients, including making sure Market Force is strategically aligned with clients' goals and objectives.

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To discuss your needs for improving performance for your multi-location brand, give us a call. We’d be happy to discuss best practices for measuring the customer experience and compliance to brand standards, using analytics to understand what matters most and the ROI for change, and technology solutions that integrate large quantities of data on one single platform. We look forward to a great discussion!

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